1000mods, Filthy Lucre, Kitchen Witch. Crown And Anchor, Adelaide. 11-04-2019.

Words Will Oakeshott.
Photos David Rubinich.

From every perspective of the people involved with this show, there was a strong element of the “unexpected” which had transpired. However, the rare and astonishing characteristic of these surprises were that they all fell under a “positive” outlook. 1000mods managed to tour our fine nation for the first time and that would have probably felt like an impossibility over their career; furthermore, multiple shows sold out at very respectable venues including Adelaide where there was tough competition also playing at other locations on this night. It would seem that the famous Cuban writer José Martí is still very accurate with this quote, even after over 120 years since his unfortunate passing: “Charm is a product of the unexpected”. Continue reading

SLAYER, Anthrax, Behemoth. Adelaide Entertainment Centre. 13-03-2019.

Words Will Oakeshott.
Photos David Rubinich.

There are miniscule opportunities in a music enthusiast’s lifetime where they would experience a memorable and irreplaceable act perform for one last time; especially in a location as remote as Australia. On this night, true royalty of the Thrash Metal genre shredded and banged their identity and art into Adelaide for one last time in their marvellously macabre manner. This “ending” may have been an epilogue of sorts; but the imprint will be everlasting. Continue reading

THE OCEAN, Chaos Divine, Toehider. Jive, Adelaide. 25-01-2019.

Words Will Oakeshott.
Photos David Rubinich.

24 Hours prior to this event, Adelaide suffered the hottest day on record; well beyond conception. This writer was left defeated as was South Australia in reality – but our resilience wasn’t. Defeat is never our definition – and our adoration for heavy music was once again showcased in quality numbers, even though the competition for live music on this night was immense; thankfully however, three excessively talented outfits rewarded the Adelaide heavy music enthusiasts to an immeasurable degree.

Melbourne three-piece Toehider proved they were not an opener but in fact, a menace. Somehow a mixture of Rush, Judas Priest and The Mars Volta worked; it was quite the extravaganza. As eccentric as it sounds, it was defying, odd and a victory. The vocal and musical gymnastics were near super-human in substance, truthfully this was an honest understatement of how they portray their art. Adelaide for the most part, could not keep up with the insane vocal delivery of front-man and guitarist Michael Mills as it was eerily similar to Rob Halford and the band’s intricacy was enthralling. In all honesty, this was more than a pleasant surprise, it was astounding, especially with This Conversation Is Over, which had an immaculate delivery. Continue reading

ASH, Lead Worm. Fowlers Live, Adelaide. 14-11-2018.

Words Will Oakeshott.
Photos David Rubinich.

An interesting fact about Wednesday is that this character from The Addams Family named after the weekday was apparently called it by her father because “Wednesday’s child is full of woe”; upsettingly upon entrance into Fowler’s Live on this “Hump Day” evening, it appeared as though the daughter of Charles Addams had used her evil abilities to diminish Adelaide’s spirit with only a minuscule audience present for the opening act. But as former NBA star Paul Pierce once said: “The game isn’t over till the clock says zero” – truthfully, there was not one aspect about this show that represented zero at all, so the show must go on.

To say that local quartet Lead Worm were ecstatic about opening this event would be a vast understatement; it was made abundantly clear by frontman / guitarist Michael Van on numerous occasions. However, from this writer’s point of view, this was the most spirited the outfit actually became in their 40 minutes in the stage light. Admittedly, there was the reduced stage size acting as a challenging obstacle, that was more than apparent and influential on the four-piece’s abilities – although honestly, the band members seemed to have little interaction with each other or their audience during song performance. Respectably, they do transport themselves into their own musical universe that lands somewhere around the post-grunge label and it is an accomplished amalgamation. All-in-all though, their delivery presents itself as slightly insipid. The influence of Californian band Oleander was enjoyably evident on songs ‘Forgive Me’ and ‘Wasted’; furthermore, Lead Worm did have the responsibility of warming up the crowd which had now grown exponentially and to that degree, they achieved a satisfactory result. Nevertheless, maybe with more bigger supporting roles and some touring opportunities, the quartet could grow to a formidable group. Continue reading