DEVIL ELECTRIC Self-Titled Album Review.

Words El Jefe.

Doom. The name says it all. From the opening riff to Black Sabbath, to the heavier than heavy tones of bands like Electric Wizard and Monolord, it’s a genre defined by dark sounds, and heavy lyrical themes. The breadth of styles within the genre is also as extreme as the sounds. The vocals can range from upper register screams to gravelrash intestine shredding and the music from the dirtiest sludge to plain old heavy rock’n’roll shot through with blues licks. But I love it all, start to finish!

Enter Devil Electric! They’re a four-piece from Melbourne and have just punched heavy music fans everywhere right between the eyes with their self-titled debut. The sound is classic doom, but they’ve also managed to twist an age-old formula to their own perverted uses, and in turn created a distinctly unique collection of songs. Continue reading

DENNIS LYXZÉN (REFUSED) Interview.

Words Mikaelie A. Evans.

Since blowing up during the Swedish hardcore-punk scene of the early ’90s, Refused have gained a reputable name for themselves worldwide as they have continuously been one of the bands on the forefront of the phenomenon.

With time comes age, experience, influence and the overall state of the world, so it’s inevitable that their sound might have changed since their 1998 release The Shape Of Punk To Come. Following their longstanding hiatus (1999–2009) that was broken with speculation, rumours and a 2012 world tour, Refused released their first studio album in 17 years during 2015 via Epitaph Records. Titled Freedom, the 10-track brought critics and fans all over (again) out of hiding and straight back into the pit. As they embarked on another run of international shows, their new album became a celebration in itself. Fast forward a year, and Refused announced that they’d be coming back Down Under in early 2017… and the time has arrived! Continue reading

DONITA SPARKS (L7) Interview.

Words Mikaelie A. Evans.
Photos Matt Munx.

It’s 5pm somewhere: an interview with Donita Sparks from L7.

Photo © Matt Munx.Remember that saying, “it’s 5pm somewhere,” and you almost feel less guilty about cracking a cheeky beer at 10am? That’s kind of how I’m starting to feel as it’s 9.45am AEST and Donita Sparks mentions that it’s 5pm where she is, looking out towards the Hollywood sign as we begin our delayed phone call. Sparks doesn’t live in Hollywood, though she can see the infamous big letters sprawled out across the hills from where she does reside in L.A.

I’m thankful that prior to having the phone line connected I was made aware that it was an international call, because I probably would have suggested we go for a cheeky morning beer if she and L7 had already landed in Australia! We exchange a brief hello, which is enthusiastic – much to my surprise – on both ends of the phone. Sparks quickly asks me how to correctly pronounce my name, which is a prominent tongue twister to many of those having to pronounce it; I break my name (Mik-hay-lee) into syllables and we both laugh at the inconvenience of unusual names. Continue reading

“Let’s do it, fire up fuck ya’s!” Higgo talks Brewtality with Eddie Fury of FIREBALLS!

Interview by Higgo.

Great to talk to Eddie Fury from Fireballs, I honestly lost count of how many times I saw them between ’94-’97, which lead to us reminiscing about the ‘90s Melbourne live music scene.

Eddie Fury (EF): We used to do a lot more of the Uni circuit, the student unions stuff, and I’m a bit out of the loop with it all, I dunno if there’s the platform for young upcoming bands to do that sort of stuff anymore, do you reckon there’s as much of a platform as there was say in the ‘90s? I definitely remember seeing a shift in the mid ‘90s music venues when pokies came in. That was the biggest shift for the arts community in Melbourne I reckon. Things were shutting down left right and centre. I mean the Bendigo is doing it these days, but the venues that are 2-300 people that have bands on 4-5 nights a week, that’s a rare commodity these days.

H: Yeah I agree, although there are still venues that do it, there’s definitely less of them, and it felt like it was as it was rising, I dunno, maybe it’s because I was discovering it all legally then, but it felt like 97-98 pokies really took hold. Continue reading

SPACEJUNK ‘Bite Your Tongue’ LP Review and Gig Launch info.

Words Joel Parnell.

Webster’s Dictionary defines ‘Space’ as “The region beyond the earth’s atmosphere or beyond the solar system” and ‘Junk’ as “Slang: Male genitalia”. These definitions withstanding, the latest offering from Melbourne scuzz-rock quartet Spacejunk is every bit as confronting, fun and perversely entertaining as a thousand half-erect penis’s flailing and jostling wildly in zero-gravity.

Spacejunk’s recorded work plays out a lot like their live set. They pretty much throw you straight in the deep end, no fucking around with softly plucked intros and shit. The atmosphere grows thick in an instant, engulfing you in a fog of violent, chaotic noise. The deep, hellish hum of bass turns your skin to fuzz as the piercing squeal of the band’s collective feedback challenges even the most seasoned of gig-goers to a battle between amp and ear-drum. Under this haze, however, you will find a great deal of musicianship on display. The drum work in particular, is stellar. Sweat drips from every pore of the four-headed rock monster as it thumps, screeches and bellows through the motions of it’s 40-odd minute tirade. Continue reading

RED LIGHT RIOT Interview + El Riot! Fest

Melbourne’s Red Light Riot are launching a new two track single, ‘In Shadows‘ / ‘Burn The Axis‘ on Sat 21 May at The Tote Hotel, Melbourne. When setting up the event, things quickly escalated and a new festival was born, El Riot! Admittedly there are a hell of a lot of festivals on at the moment but who cares when as a punter you can see 15 bands for $17 presale tickets! Absolute bargain!

We caught up with Red Light Riot and asked them about the new tracks, why they chose the bands on the lineup and The Tote for their launch, and more.

DHWYS: Red Light Riot has been around for over three years and has had a few lineup changes, can you tell us a bit about the current lineup, their backgrounds and maybe something about the band that we wouldn’t know from reading your bio?

RLR: We have a new rhythm section who has been with us since the last half of 2015. We have Carlos DeSouza on drums and Nick Ivkovic on bass, who is also in metal band Elm Street and was in female fronted rock’n’roll band The Scarlets. Our other members Kristy (Killriot), Nina (von Johannsohn) and Ed (Jones) have been with RLR since our debut gig in 2013. Kristy also fronts Gold Coast punk band Kill The Apprentice, Nina is in post punk band Stay Sharp and Ed’s last band was Hellbent Revelators with James Grim. Continue reading

CHERIE CURRIE (The Runaways) Interview.

Words El Jefe.

It was one of those days. First day back at work from annual leave, up early. But I was also locked in for a quick chat with Cherie Currie, frontwoman for The Runaways, solo artist, actor, author, as well as (I had only learnt the night before!) chainsaw artist and is also about to begin her Australian tour this May. So things weren’t all bad. I dialed the number in the states (555….) and was greeted by Cherie’s very warm and friendly voice. I also found her to be very open and charismatic. And she was a whole lot of fun to have a conversation with.

Cherie: Hey, is this Jeff? How are you, great to talk to you!

EJ: Hey Cherie, thanks for the chance to talk to you, I’m really excited about this. Being on limited time, I thought I’d jump straight in. For starters, I was checking out some of your chainsaw carvings, which really intrigued me. I hadn’t seen this done before and was wondering what the inspiration to do this was.

Cherie: I had been sculpting and sketching for a long time, I was just always drawn to creating art. I was driving one day, in 2002, and passed some guys who were doing it. I was fascinated, and while I didn’t stop at the time, I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I went back a couple of weeks later, and met the guys and they agreed to take me on as an apprentice. When I first told my family, they were totally against me doing it, working with chainsaws and forbid me to do it. But I wasn’t going to be stopped and being forbidden to do it just made me want to do it more. It’s not an easy thing to learn, but before too long, I was winning competitions with my carvings, and selling them as well. I have my own gallery now as well. Continue reading

JAKE TAYLOR (IN HEARTS WAKE) Interview + Groovin’ The Moo.

Words Will Oakeshott.

Author and strategist Gary Ryan Blair may not be of international notoriety yet, but his deficiency in fame certainly does not impede his intelligence. Whilst this introduction may seem rather off topic to the reader at this early stage, there is reason behind the absurdity. There is a quote by Mr. Blair which reads as: “Advancement only comes with habitually doing more than you are asked”. Certainly this reads as a somewhat obvious “advice statement” to achieve success; but it is possible to uncover further applications to this aforementioned passage.

Byron Bay’s In Hearts Wake are a prime example of adopting the cited statement and translating it into their motif. For instance, when the melodic metalcore quintet entered the studio to record their sophomore album Earthwalker released in 2014, the band did more than what was asked of them, A LOT more. Matter-of-factly the five-piece recorded two full-lengths in secret and followed the wildly successful second record with their third album Skydancer just a year later. Continue reading

LUPUS LINDEMANN (KADAVAR) Interview + Australian Tour Dates.

Words El Jefe.

Kadavar have only been with us for a mere 6 years, but have achieved a shitload in that time. Three studio LP’s plus a live one all chock full of heavy-handed ‘70s riff-rock under their belts, countless tours as well as being stabled at Nuclear Blast, a label that needs no introduction. It’s an impressive resume, and proof that sometimes the gods are just in your corner. Not to imply that they haven’t worked hard.

I had a quiet chat with guitarist / vocalist Lupus Lindemann.

El Jefe: Hey Lupus, thanks for your time today. Could we start with a brief history of Kadavar? Continue reading

RATHEAD self-titled debut EP review + launch date.

Words Joel Parnell.

Despite being a small rural city with virtually no music scene to speak of, Shepparton is surprisingly chockas with great musicians. While only a measly few have broken the mould and been able to Sheppresent to the wider world in recent times (Australia’s answer to Ice Cube: Briggs, for one), there are plenty of sick tunes banging around in the 3630 if you just take the time to listen for them. One such example is the two-piece skate-punk band Rathead, who are just gearing up to drop their debut EP on April 23rd.

Rathead is Sam McPherson (Platypus) and Taylor Bain (Inedia, System Failure). The boys play the kind of music you would have heard on Tony Hawks Pro Skater 2 if only they weren’t 16 years too late (that’s a good thing). Their self titled debut drops in like a drunk Dustin Dollin with ‘Anything’, a song that bleeds melodic charisma while staying true to DIY punk-rock code of conduct. The production is raw as fuck and lends itself perfectly to the band’s stripped back style. Taylor Bains vocal style pays homage to ’80s skate-punk pioneers Gray Matter, yet retains a unique and refreshing tone for a heavy band. One thing that sets Rathead apart from their contemporaries is that they don’t rely on excessive screaming to give their songs an edge, nor do they indulge in any drawn out guitar solos. It’s just no-nonsense, get-to-the-fucking-point punk rock. Continue reading